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Birds

Resources for bird nerds.

This cam is located in the Treman Bird Feeding Garden at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, New York. Perched on the edge of both Sapsucker Woods and its 10-acre pond, these feeders attract both forest species like chickadees and woodpeckers as well as some species that prefer open environments near water like Red-winged Blackbirds.

 

The Panama Fruit Feeder Cam is located on the grounds of the Canopy Lodge in El Valle de Antón, Panama. This site is just over 2,000 ft above sea level in the low mountains of Cerro Gaital, with a mild springtime climate year-round. A small stream called Rio Guayabo runs past the feeders in the background, and the lush landscaping of the Canopy Lodge grounds grade into the forested slopes around them.

 

The Mississippi River Flyway Cam is on an island in the heart of the Mississippi River’s Driftless area. Located in the Upper Mississippi National Fish and Wildlife Refuge on Lake Onalaska, and offers an unparalleled look at migrating birds and river wildlife including bald eagles, American white pelicans, sandhill cranes, Caspian terns, cormorants, and many species of ducks, gulls, and other waterfowl.

This bald eagle nest cam is located Washington D.C.'s National Arboretum and is home to Mr. President & The First Lady. The cam was installed in summer of 2015. They usually lay 2 eggs per season but there were no eggs in 2019. Tune in in February and March to see what happens!

This Mississippi River Flyway Cam is on an island in the heart of the Mississippi River’s Driftless area. Located in the Upper Mississippi National Fish and Wildlife Refuge on Lake Onalaska, and offers an unparalleled look at migrating birds and river wildlife including bald eagles, American white pelicans, sandhill cranes, Caspian terns, cormorants, and many species of ducks, gulls, and other waterfowl.

The YouTube channel MyBackyardBirding has many great videos that are helpful with identifying birds that may visit your feeders in the Northeast. This video contains examples of 80 common Backyard Birds from mostly eastern half of the US with many being migratory. Plenty of useful information, ideas and examples to pique your bird watching curiosity!