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Citation Tracking & Bibliometrics

This guide helps people learn about the citation searching process and the citation indexes available to the world of scholarly publishing.

What is Bibliometrics?

The branch of library science concerned with the application of mathematical and statistical analysis to bibliography; the statistical analysis of books, articles, or other publications.  (see definition in Oxford English Dictionary Online)

Bibliometric measures are data about publications, or citation frequency.

Scientometrics is the branch of information science concerned with the application of bibliometrics to the study of the spread of scientific ideas; the bibliometric analysis of science.  (see definition in Oxford English Dictionary Online)

Where to Find Citation Tools and Measures

Journal Citation Reports (Thomson Reuters)

Thomson Reuters' Journal Citation Reports database is found on the Databases A-Z page. Below is a screenshot of the 2011 list of Journals in the "Engineering, Mechanical" category, showing all the types of metrics included in a Journal Citation Report.

Journal impact tools and measures

Journals

Journal Citation Reports (Thomson Reuters)

Impact Factor

  - [# of citations in a year]/[total # of articles published in 2 previous years]

  - Eugene Garfield, 1950s

Article Influence (uses Thomson Reuters citation data; in Journal Citation Reports or at http://www.eigenfactor.org)

Eigenfactor (uses Thomson Reuters citation data; in Journal Citation Reports or at http://www.eigenfactor.org)

Scopus (Elsevier)

Journal Analyzer (uses Elsevier citation data; in Scopus)

SNIP (uses Elsevier citation data; in Scopus or at http://www.scimagojr.com/index.php)

SJR (uses Elsevier citation data; in Scopus or at http://www.journalindicators.com/)

SNIP and SJR explained

SNIP & SJR @ Journalmetrics.com by Elsevier

Authors

h index (used in many citation trackers including Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus)

Jorge Hirsche, 2005

Based on author's years active as well as number of citations of specific articles

Example: h score of 10 = at least 10 articles cited at least 10 times each

g index (used in Publish or Perish, elsewhere)

Leo Egghe, 2006

Adds weight to heavily-cited articles in h-index metric

Journal Impact Factor: Example

Journal Impact Factor (JIF) score for Progress in Energy and Combustion Science:

 

 

2012 2011 Total
Cites in 2013 to items published per year 471 459 930
Number of items published per year 30 25 55
2013 Impact factor
(Cites to recent items/Number of recent items)
   

16.909

 

G-index

Invented by Leo Egghe (scientometrician, Belgium; in "Theory and practise of the g-index," Scientometrics, Vol. 69, No. 1 (2006) 131–152)

  • Adds weight to heavily-cited articles in h-index metric
  • The average of citations matched by the number of articles rather than the number of citations matched by the number of articles

Image: By Ael 2 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

H-index

Invented by Jorge Hirsch (physicist, UCSD), 2005

Used in Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus

Based on years active as well as number of citations of specific articles (as well as your subscription span to Web of Science)

  • h score of 10 = at least 10 articles cited at least 10 times each

Image: By en:user:Ael 2, vectorized by pl:user:Vulpecula (vectorized version of File:H-index_plot.PNG) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Database Help